5 Common Mistakes with Bucket Elevators and How to Prevent Them - ISC

Bucket elevators are an essential piece of machinery for many industries, as they provide a safe and efficient means of conveying bulk materials from one level to another. However, there are a number of common mistakes that can be made when designing, installing, and operating bucket elevators, which can lead to reduced performance, increased maintenance costs, and even safety hazards. In this post, we will discuss five of the most common mistakes made with bucket elevators, and what can be done to avoid them.

Designing with too thin of material

One of the most common mistakes made in bucket elevator design is using material that is too thin, especially for the main casing or the discharge chutes. This can lead to structural weakness and increased risk of damage, particularly when conveying abrasive or heavy materials. To avoid this, it is important to select materials that are appropriate for the intended use of the bucket elevator, and to design the casing and discharge chutes with sufficient thickness to withstand the expected loads.

Discharge chutes are often too small

The discharge chute is an important component of a bucket elevator, as it helps to control the flow of material and prevent it from spilling out of the bucket. However, many bucket elevators are designed with discharge chutes that are too small, which can lead to material jamming, reduced capacity, and increased maintenance costs. To avoid this, it is important to select a discharge chute size that is appropriate for the material being conveyed, and to ensure that it is large enough to prevent blockages.

No digger buckets when needed

Some bucket elevators are designed without digger buckets, which are used to help break up clumps of material and prevent blockages. This can be a mistake, as digger buckets are essential for many materials, and can greatly improve the performance and reliability of a bucket elevator. If digger buckets are not specified, it is important to assess the characteristics of the material being conveyed and determine whether they are necessary.

Not fed correctly

Another common mistake made with bucket elevators is not feeding them correctly. Bucket elevators should not be flood fed, as this can cause overloading, material jamming, and reduced performance. To avoid this, it is important to regulate the flow of material into the bucket elevator, and to use feeding equipment that is appropriate for the type of material being conveyed.

No belt alignment sensors

Finally, many bucket elevators are not equipped with belt alignment sensors, which are used to detect and correct misalignment of the belt. This can be a mistake, as misalignment can cause reduced performance, increased wear and tear on the belt, and increased maintenance costs. To avoid this, it is important to equip bucket elevators with belt alignment sensors, and to regularly check and adjust the alignment as needed.

In conclusion, bucket elevators are an essential piece of machinery for many industries, but they are not without their challenges. By avoiding these five common mistakes, you can ensure that your bucket elevator is designed, installed, and operated in a way that maximizes its performance, reliability, and safety. Whether you are installing a new bucket elevator, or upgrading an existing one, taking these steps will help you get the most out of this important piece of machinery.